Mark Levin, Meet Herbert Croly

From First Thoughts

Or, The Conservative Case for Decreasing the Two-Thirds and Three-Fourths Requirements for Amendment In 1914, arch-progressive Herbert Croly founded The New Republic magazine and published his second book, Progressive Democracy. A rich (if at times annoyingly abstract) text, one of its more . . . . Continue Reading »

More on Jean Bethke Elshtain

From First Thoughts

Russel Arben Fox provides a first-class and link-rich overview of Elshtain’s career over at Front Porch Republic . He reminds me of much that I learned from her. Like Fox, I think a highlight of her career was a number of essays and reviews she wrote for The New Republic in the 1990s. Unlike . . . . Continue Reading »

In Praise of St. John’s College

From First Thoughts

Probably most pomocon readers know about this special place, but it’s good to be reminded. Now if I started to praise, and talk about my time at, St. John’s, the post would be a very long one indeed. But today there’s some praise from Roger Kimball I can send you to, and as it it . . . . Continue Reading »

Denial Is a Robert Kagan Column on Egypt

From First Thoughts

My policy on the Egypt debate is to be charitable, assuming that no-one has a full handle on things. For example, when a commenter recommended a Spengler column that savaged the Reuel Marc Gerecht essay I had partially recommended , I was pretty repelled, even though I had rejected Gerecht’s . . . . Continue Reading »

50s Permissiveness

From First Thoughts

Allan Carlson at Imaginative Conservative reviews a 2009 book by historian Alan Pertigny, The Permissive Society: America, 1941-1965 . The title pretty much says it! Pertigny argues that the sexual revolution, and many related trends, were already well underway prior to the advent of the Pill and . . . . Continue Reading »

Facing the Likelihood of Muburak II

From First Thoughts

Continuing my reflections on the coup, prompted by Reuel Marc Gerecht’s essay (linked below). Perhaps his key sentence was this one: As long as the religious are more numerous, political parties that explicitly claim the faith will have an advantage over the secular, intellectually . . . . Continue Reading »