A Sabbath Meal

From the March 1999 Print Edition

Probably the most important cultural phenomenon in contemporary Jewry is the rise of what some have called the “ ba’al teshuvah movement.” This is the return to traditional Judaism by a number of young Jews who had heretofore been estranged from it. These young Jews have brought a . . . . Continue Reading »

The Mind of Maimonides

From the February 1999 Print Edition

The following is the second in a series that examines through the prism of a key figure each century of the millennium now coming to a close. David Novak considers the twelfth century and Moses Maimonides. Next month: Romanus Cessario on the thirteenth century and Thomas Aquinas. ”The Editors . . . . Continue Reading »

The Rebbe’s Son

From the October 1998 Print Edition

Abraham Joshua Heschel: Prophetic Witness By Edward K. Kaplan and Samuel H. Dresner Yale University Press. 416 pp. $35 Abraham Joshua Heschel (1907“1972) was the most significant Jewish thinker ever to live and work in America. His significance is such that without him no Jewish thinker of my . . . . Continue Reading »

Beyond Supersessionism

From the March 1998 Print Edition

The God of Israel and Christian Theology By R. Kendall Soulen Fortress, 195 pp. $19 paper. This book is an impressive debut by a young Protestant theologian, R. Kendall Soulen. It began as his dissertation at Yale, but unlike most dissertations in theology, it is much more than a demonstration of . . . . Continue Reading »

Fighting on Three Fronts

From the March 1993 Print Edition

Jewish Polemics by Arthur Hertzberg Columbia University Press, 259 pages, $27.95 Jewish Polemics is a collection of essays written over the past ten years or so by the well-known American rabbi, professor, and communal leader Arthur Hertzberg. The title of the collection is aptly chosen: anyone who . . . . Continue Reading »

When Jews Are Christians

From the November 1991 Print Edition

I By now it is obvious that in the past twenty-five years or so there has been considerable progress in the Jewish-Christian relationship. Overcoming centuries of mutual hostility or indifference, some Jews and Christians are now able to engage in honest and fruitful dialogue and, as religious . . . . Continue Reading »