Righting Wrongs

From the February 2010 Print Edition

Reappraising the Right: The Past and Future of American Conservatism by George H. Nash ISI Books, 400 pages, $27.95 Conservatism in the United States begins at a rhetorical disadvantage. Conservatives believe in preserving tradition, but in America the distinctive national tradition is liberal. A . . . . Continue Reading »

Simon Schama Whigs Out

From the November 2009 Print Edition

The American Future: A History by Simon Schama Ecco, 400 pages, $29.99 It’s not easy for an author to disqualify his book from serious consideration with his first sentence, but in The American Future: A History , Simon Schama comes close: “I can tell you exactly, give or take a minute or . . . . Continue Reading »

Day by Day

From the April 2009 Print Edition

Richard John Neuhaus had a big life, but his day-by-day world was a small one. There was his comfortable, though hardly luxurious, apartment in the townhouse occupied by the Community of Christ in the City on Nineteenth Street; the Immaculate Conception parish where he served as priest a few blocks . . . . Continue Reading »

A Nation of Hustlers

From the January 2009 Print Edition

Throes of Democracy: The American Civil War Era, 1829“1877 by Walter A. McDougall Harper, 787 pages, $34.95 American history is very popular these days, but histories of America”comprehensive accounts of the national experience”are not. Academics continue to churn out textbooks . . . . Continue Reading »

Neither Hot Nor Cold

From the February 2008 Print Edition

Godly Republic: A Centrist Blueprint for America’s Faith-Based Future By John J. DiIulio Jr. University of California Press, 329 pages, $24.95 It is, as a general rule, wise to be skeptical of those who describe themselves as political centrists. People who claim to be nonideological . . . . Continue Reading »

Our New Deal Nation

From the October 2004 Print Edition

Presidential reputations tend to fluctuate according to contemporary preoccupations. Andrew Johnson, to cite a random example, was once upon a time widely pictured as a martyr to the noble cause of Abraham Lincoln’s desire to bring reconciliation to the nation following the Civil War, a victim . . . . Continue Reading »

Last Time

From the February 2004 Print Edition

My original idea was a quiet exit, entirely without fuss: out the door and back to Indiana. No explanations, no farewells, no summing up. But colleagues and friends objected: people might misunderstand, think I was leaving under duress or in a fit of pique. Since neither of these is the . . . . Continue Reading »