Age of Accountability

From First Thoughts

I think I’ve hit on one of the things that’s been lurking in the background in my resistance to the idea of an age of accountability. Now this post will largely be assuming some things many here will not grant, e.g. exclusivism about who gets saved, Christian particularism about how they . . . . Continue Reading »

Fetal Pain

From First Thoughts

Pro-choice activists are making a big deal about a new study claiming to show that human beings feel no pain until about 24 weeks into their fetal life. Lots of studies have appeared contradicting each other on this, so this is hardly news. There’s been lots of debate on this for several . . . . Continue Reading »

Gender-Inclusive

From First Thoughts

My post on slaves and sons reminded me of a point I’ve been thinking that I don’t think I’ve ever discussed with anyone or written anything about. The term “gender-inclusive” has come to be associated with a certain translation philosophy in Bible translation, namely . . . . Continue Reading »

Sons and Slaves

From First Thoughts

It’s rare that I post on something I encounter that I have almost nothing to say about, but I was just catching up on Mark Heath’s blog, and this post struck me as brilliant. Mark notices all the slave language and son language in the New Testament for believers and wonders . . . . Continue Reading »

Charity and the Hardest Reading

From First Thoughts

It strikes me that two principles commonly used in textual criticism can actually cancel each other out.1. Charity to the Author: Other things being equal, it’s generally better to be charitable to the author when we can do so. If we find two readings in manuscripts, where one makes a lot . . . . Continue Reading »

Basic Inerrancy

From First Thoughts

Matt Flanagan’s Inerrancy and Biblical Authority discussed Glenn Peoples’ Inerrantly Assuming Inerrancy in History. There are so many things I disagree with in the latter post that it was very hard to pull myself away from my desire to write a detailed response, but I . . . . Continue Reading »