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Pro-Life Plaster

From First Thoughts

Brazilian student Jorge Lopes has pioneered the conversion of data from ultrasound and MRI scans into life-size plaster models of living embryos using a method called rapid prototyping. ‘It’s amazing to see the faces of the mothers,” says Lopes, who created the technology for his . . . . Continue Reading »

The Unpardonable Sin of Hypocrisy

From First Thoughts

In the eyes of the media, Mark Sanford has committed the unpardonable social sin. No, not adultery—is that even frowned upon anymore?—but the sin of being a hypocrite. For example, the inexplicably popular Rachel Maddow of MSNBC had a segment on her show last night on Sanford’s . . . . Continue Reading »

Around the Way

From First Thoughts

What’s going on at other First Things blogs: The Anchoress : What’s the deal with saints in glass coffins? Spengler : “The Persians invented chess. What opponent’s move would Ayatollah Khameini anticipate? ” Secondhand Smoke : Wesley Smith wonders if the dependent . . . . Continue Reading »

Kinkade’s Cottage Fantasy

From First Thoughts

“How did Christian art go from Rembrandt to Kinkade?” I asked, knowing full well any criticism of Thomas Kinkade, the self-proclaimed (and trademarked) Painter of Light™, would lead to howls of protest.  Kinkade is, as his website proclaims, “America’s most . . . . Continue Reading »

Fill a Pew, Get a Brew

From First Thoughts

A diocese in the Church of England, has found a creative way to get men to come to church. This past Sunday the church offered a range of incentives for men attending Father’s Day service, including bacon rolls, chocolate bars, and  free beer . [The Rt Rev John Inge, the Bishop of . . . . Continue Reading »

No Longer Beholden to Caulfield

From First Thoughts

Since its publication in 1951, J.D. Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye has been the favored bildungsroman novel of the American teen. At least it was, that is, before the arrival of the current generation of discerning readers : Teachers say young readers just don’t like Holden as much as . . . . Continue Reading »

The Gospel of Juneteenth

From First Thoughts

Although bad news travels fast, good news often takes the scenic route. That appears to have been especially true during the Civil War. Although Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation became official on the first day of January 1863, word didn’t arrive in Texas until June 19, 1865. On that . . . . Continue Reading »