Educating for Community

From First Thoughts

I’m blessed to have the opportunity to teach my class on ancient and medieval political philosophy this semester. Right now, we’re reading and discussing Aristophanes’ Clouds , which (for those who haven’t read it) is a comedic presentation of a “pre-Socratic” . . . . Continue Reading »

Citing Dissent to Stop School Choice

From First Thoughts

A state judge in New Hampshire has ruled against a recently enacted program that would have provided tax credits to businesses that contributed to scholarship organizations similar to those in the Arizona program upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2011. There are a few things about the opinion . . . . Continue Reading »

Union Organizing at Religious Colleges

From First Thoughts

Adjunct faculty at Pacific Lutheran University have persuaded the National Labor Relations Board that they have the right to vote on whether to be represented by the Service Employees International Union. While the Supreme Court has held that religious institutions are generally outside NLRB . . . . Continue Reading »

A College’s Fidelity to Its Heritage

From First Thoughts

Roughly a year ago, I wrote about the Davidson College Board of Trustees’ reconsideration of its requirement that the College’s president be a Presbyterian. Well, the board has reaffirmed its requirement , explaining that “the Reformed Tradition values considered to have . . . . Continue Reading »

Milbank and Koyzis Revisited

From First Thoughts

Permit me to connect what I take to be the dots between recent posts on John Milbank and by David T. Koyzis . For fun, you can also take a look at this post by Koyzis on another site. We have made an idol of choice, regarding it as the logical concomitant of our “natural” freedom. But . . . . Continue Reading »

Kids These Days

From First Thoughts

As I’ve mentioned before , I’m leading a seminar on the family and political thought. There are seven of us all told, five smart and accomplished young women, a sharp young man, and their cranky middle-aged professor. We’re finishing up by reading the . . . . Continue Reading »