A few years back, First Things published a somewhat incredulous  While We’re At It entry noticing the curiously named Eternal Earth-Bound Pets, a service that promised to take care of pets left behind after the rapture. (It was recently confirmed to be satire by the proprietor, who reports he’s gotten New Hampshire’s state insurance regulators concerned. He also says he’s never retained any clients.) Clever, still, even if only for uniting the interests of pretribulationist prepping-types with those of atheist pet-lovers.

But as far as one can tell, pet obituaries have remained unexplored territory—-until now. Singapore’s largest newspaper, The Straits Times , will soon publish remembrances of deceased pets (photographs are allowed). And no mention of pet veneration can go without a word about what makes it attractive—-pets satisfy the nurturing urge without nearly as much fuss as children:

The decision to market obituaries to pet owners in tiny Singapore, one of the world’s richest countries in terms of per capita income, comes as wealthy Asians have fewer kids and shower more attention on pets.

Research firm Euromonitor, in a recent report on Singapore’s pet care market, said people are spending more on premium pet food as well as accessories such as strollers for dogs and designer pet clothing.

“Many pet owners are increasingly treating their pets as household members and are therefore pampering their pets with luxurious food, products and services, just as they would dote on their family,” it said.

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