The King’s College “can seek perhaps no better model than Carl F. H. Henry, “ on whom Gregory A. Thornbury, the recently-announced incoming president of the King’s College, “happens to be an expert and happens to have just written a book.” says Gene Fant in today’s column .

After begging his readers not to skip reading Henry themselves, Thornbury summarizes fifteen important theological themes in the Henrician corpus. The arc begins with revelation, moves to the Scriptures as truth, to the Holy Spirit’s role in illumination and interpretation, then to the Church’s role in God’s kingdom, ending in God’s self-manifestation in the consummation of the ages. The space limitations of a single chapter mean that the overview is at once breathless in its pace and breathtaking in its scope . . . .

“I want to make Carl Henry cool again,” Thornbury exclaims in the introduction. Given that we can recognize Henry’s thoughts almost everywhere we look these days, such an aspiration is not terribly ridiculous. I would love to see the book cover in many a coffeehouse in the coming days, and would love even more to see Henry himself return as a staple of theological conversations. He was a giant whose legacy deserves to be recovered.


Read the full column here .

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