Interpreting the Papacy

It’s no secret that there have been bad popes. In today’s On the Square , Brantly Millegan warns against an extreme ultramontanism: A number of Catholic authors have endeavored to defend Pope Francis from criticism, particularly stemming from his recent interview. They have tried to . . . . Continue Reading »

Symbolic War

Ukraine is at a crossroads, and not only symbolically, says Peter Leithart in his On the Square today. Stuck between the East and the West, between its recent past and its deeper past, the country has two competing iconographies: Christian and Soviet. When we come into the open, we’re standing . . . . Continue Reading »

First Links — 9.27.13

Is Bach the Voice of God in Music? Daniel Johnson, Standpoint Christian Schools and Racial Realities Hunter Baker, Touchstone New York’s Lost “Little Syria” Angela Serratone, Paris Review Philosopher Portraits, Series I Renee Jorgensen Bollinger Can We Finally Start Talking About . . . . Continue Reading »

Odd-Numbered Hospitality

Over at her always-stimulating blog today, LaVonne Neff writes about some of the ironies of her mother’s practice of hospitality in the late 1950s : Something you should know about tall women who seem reserved and even distant—they may just be shy or socially awkward, and they may really . . . . Continue Reading »

Is the Pope a Radical?

Another voice has joined the fray in the aftermath of the Pope’s much-discussed interview. Pope Francis “is not a radical. He is something more interesting and unexpected both inside the church and out: a radical traditionalist,”  claims Mary Eberstadt in  Time . . . . . Continue Reading »

Quidquid Latine Dictum Sit Altum Videtur

The Church of Our Saviour has stopped offering the Tridentine Mass. Nicholas Frankovich comments on its passing in today’s On the Square : Mass according to the 1962 missal demands a knowledge of the Latin texts and of some fairly intricate rubrics. It requires training that most priests now . . . . Continue Reading »