Twitter Killed Woody Allen

The man himself in New York magazine : NY: Do you have a theory about why the culture keeps getting coarser? WA: The country has, over the years, moved to the right. And it’s possible that accompanying that move to the right, you also get a lessening of taste. But I don’t know if what . . . . Continue Reading »

1968:Scarcity and Decade Analysis

I’ve already promoted Dan Mahoney’s excellent analysis of the socio-political import of 1968, especially from the perspective of France. Our own Peter Lawler provides his original critical commentary here cautioning us that as seminal as ‘68 was, a fuller picture of the . . . . Continue Reading »

Why Ricoeur?

Commenter Paulie wants to know. Well, there’s no denying that postmodern theory is intimately intertangled with the "hermeneutic of suspicion." Ricoeur helped us level against Habermasian liberal thinkers the complaint that ideologies could become so clever that what appeared to be . . . . Continue Reading »

Conservatives don’t fear a world without meaning?

Given what she just wrote , I’m hoping Helen can hit this one out of the park. Over at LadyBlog, Bonnie Lindblom quotes a professor at Northwestern University saying the following: "Conservatives worry about societal collapse, liberals worry about a world without deep feelings and . . . . Continue Reading »

1968 and the Meaning of Democracy

The ever-prolific Dan Mahoney revisits the revolutionary upheavals of 1968 , particularly as they manifested themselves in France, and masterfully explores their underlying philosophical significance and continuing social and political ramifications today. The commemorations of these . . . . Continue Reading »

Self-Medication and Modernity

Matt Crawford ably explains how college campuses have become incubators of schoolmarmish therapeutic supervision. No longer confident in the mission of higher education and therefore too hobbled to resist becoming an adjunct of popular society versus an engine of . . . . Continue Reading »

Neuroscience and the Poetry of the Soul

Time for  a moment of self-promotion (not entirely shameless—-I’m mildly embarrassed). For those of you who haven’t yet read my short piece on the marriage of reductionist neuroscience and post-modern poetry here at Culture11 , there is also a much longer piece at The . . . . Continue Reading »

Postmodern Conservatism and Alienation

Peter probably has the right idea—it’s worth some effort kicking off the new blog by trying to hash out what postmodern conservatism means. I’ve been re-reading a lot of Christopher Lasch lately, especially the work following The Cutlure of Narcissism (1979) . Lasch argued for a . . . . Continue Reading »

Postmodern Conservatism and Diversity

Genuine diversity depends, of course, on lives formed by different understandings of the self or soul. Our tradition of diversity has been largely of diverse religious communities. Now we talk so much about diversity because we’re anxiously aware that we’re losing it. Diversity has . . . . Continue Reading »