What We've Been Reading—5.27.16

Take the train to Brussels, walk across the Warendepark, and into the Berlaymont building. This is the home of the European Commission. Depending on which entomologist you consult, it is either the cocoon from which a new Europe will emerge or the center of a vast spider-web of regulation that is choking the continent.


First Links — 5.27.16

How God Messed Up My Happy Atheist Life
Nicole Cliffe, Christianity Today

Philosophy and Art Criticism
Kate Havard, Claremont Review of Books

Vatican Liturgy Chief Urges Priests to Celebrate Mass Facing East
Staff, Catholic Herald

An Elite Faith
Bill McMorris, Washington Free Breacon

The Enduring Legacy of The Twilight Zone
Brian Murray, New Atlantis

Why I Didn’t Attend My Notre Dame Graduation
Alexandra DeSanctis, Ethika Politika

The Case for Banning Pornography
Matthew Schmitz, Washington Post

Movies on Marriage: The Lobster vs. Love and Friendship
Tim Markatos, Acculturated

The Convict-Bourgeois
Eve Tushnet, University Bookman

Why I'm Anti-Anti-Trump

It's time for our political intelligensia to wake up. So argues Walter Russell Mead in a thoughtful piece in The American Interest, “The Meaning of Mr. Trump.” Forget about handicapping the race between Trump and Clinton. Forget about itemizing Trump's liabilities and failings. What's important . . . . Continue Reading »

A Movement, Hijacked

Subverted recounts the untold history of how the feminist and pro-abortion movements became allied. Part exposé, part conversion memoir, Browder’s book defies easy categorization, but by the end, I understood her approach. Browder’s honest account of her personal life—including her choice to have an abortion, despite being in a loving marriage—highlights the contradictions between reality and the flashy fantasy of the ­sexually liberated woman. . . . Continue Reading »

Saintly Defiance on Stage

Franz Jägerstätter, born in 1907, led a wild youth in Austria, turned to God after fearing he had killed another man in a fight, and settled down with a wife to run a farm and father children. In 1943, he refused the draft out of a conviction that a Catholic could not fight for Nazism. Defying the entreaties of mother, neighbors, priest, and bishop, he went to the guillotine. Even after the war, Jägerstätter’s countrymen called him a traitor and denied his widow, Franziska, and their three daughters any aid. Only in 2007 was Jägerstätter beatified by Benedict XVI. . . . Continue Reading »