Biotechnology and Human Nature

Our own Peter Lawler gives an account of human nature and our peculiar capacity for technologically transforming it. Considering the views of Heidegger, Wendell Berry, and Pascal he argues that while our attraction to the rational manipulation of nature is a defining hallmark of our being, the new . . . . Continue Reading »

Modernity and Celebrity

The peculiar modern obsession with celebrity voyeurism is typically unattractive but often instructive: one can argue that our preoccupation with fame signifies the persistant recognition of Aristotle’s magnanimity, albeit in a deformed version, against the regnant leveling tendencies of . . . . Continue Reading »

Ways to Upset Helen

While performing my bi-weekly survey of what the transhumanists are up to, I happened upon this little gem . From the abstract: Postgenderism is an extrapolation of ways that technology is eroding the biological, psychological and social role of gender, and an argument for why the erosion of binary . . . . Continue Reading »

From Upward Mobility to Upward Nobility

Rod quotes David Rieff, who writes in personally, and reflects: consumerism is Promethean knowledge and [ . . . ] the only alternative to it is economic catastrophe —- something only the most convinced of misanthropes could possibly welcome. Is he correct? Is the only alternative to being . . . . Continue Reading »

The Modern Center

Over at The American Scene, Alan Jacobs does the public service of reminding us that those medieval Christians didn’t put Earth at the center of the universe because they were arrogant: The center of the medieval cosmos is not the most important place, but the stillest and deadest place, the . . . . Continue Reading »