The L Word

Every once in a while — or maybe often — it’s worth a reality check to see if theory matches up to practice. Of course those of us inclined to note that being precedes consciousness (or practice precedes reason) are inclined to pay attention to what’s going on in the real . . . . Continue Reading »

In Re: Fresh Ideas

A possibility Helen doesn’t explore explicitly is that Obama’s broad but thin and vague popularity is in some significant measure the consequence of stale ideas on the right — or at least of the inability of the right to translate their ideas into practice. We should wonder more . . . . Continue Reading »

PowerPoint and Philosophy

I make the argument here that an increasing reliance upon Powerpoint among college professors in the humanities reveals much about the state of liberal education and the condition of professional philosophy today. A snippet: The hidden premise beneath the proliferation of PowerPoint in university . . . . Continue Reading »

Socrates Belongs to the Red States (II)

Here’s Daniel Larison (more specifically, one of many good points Daniel Larison makes in response to this post ): If it was absurd to say that an unexamined life was worth living, as the “red state” correspondent claimed, it is perhaps even more absurd to say that a complicated . . . . Continue Reading »

Socrates Belongs to the Red States

The recent C11 piece about a Red State’s-eye-view of life was, among other things, a juicy piece of blog bait. I’ll bite: Traditional peoples have met opposition from the beginning of history. Our way of life drives some people nuts. We do not subject our values to critical thinking and . . . . Continue Reading »

Brooks: Trouble in the Sense Field

The uncanny and unsettling distance between what seems and what is pops up again in David Brooks’s latest column . These are my bolds below: If you wanted to pick words to capture Patio Man’s political ideals, they would be responsibility, respectability and order. Patio Man moved to . . . . Continue Reading »