The Forgotten Pogrom

On August 23 of this year, armed men stormed a Hindu school in the Kandhamal district in Orissa, a remote and destitute state in eastern India, and killed the Hindu leader Laxmanananda Saraswati and four of his followers. (Saraswati had belonged to a radical Hindu association opposed to the . . . . Continue Reading »

A Home for Homeschoolers

Gregory and Martine Millman did not set out to homeschool their children, at least not consciously. When they became parents in the mid-1980s, their plan to was to lead “a normal yuppie life,” upwardly mobile, working their way into a neighborhood with good schools which of course their . . . . Continue Reading »

The Car Wreck

This semester I’m teaching a really fun course: Foundations of the Christian Intellectual Tradition. Last week we began a two-week-long segment on Greek tragedy.“What makes a tragedy tragic?” I asked. I have a group of really sharp freshman, and they opined about this or that movie, . . . . Continue Reading »

The Regime of Science

This year marks the fortieth anniversary of an influential yet little known manifesto. In the December 1968 issue of Science magazine, within months of San Francisco’s “summer of love,” University of California biologist Garrett Hardin published his revolutionary essay, “The . . . . Continue Reading »

No One Sees God

Michael Novak, the author of On Two Wings and Washington’s God (with Jana Novak), discusses his new book, No One Sees God , which hits bookstores in August. What is the point of your book? My experience has shown me that self-knowledge has a huge impact on what one thinks about God. If God is . . . . Continue Reading »

Hard Times for Great Books

In November 2007, the National Endowment for the Arts published a report titled To Read or Not To Read: A Question of National Consequence . Building on its earlier research, in Reading at Risk: A Survey of Literary Reading in America (2004), the 2007 report provided, in the words of NEA chairman . . . . Continue Reading »

Changes in the Land

Conjuring images of the old American West is not hard to do: the empty plain and the big sky, the wagon train, cowboys versus Indians, the gold-crazed forty-niner or the oil baron, probably corrupt, in search of a financial bonanza. And of course we cannot forget the rugged individualist on . . . . Continue Reading »

A Conservative Case for the Paulson Plan

As I write late on Thursday evening, some conservative Republican senators and representatives are opposing the Paulson bailout plan because they think that the government should not intervene in the market¯that it is better to let financial institutions that took risks that turned out badly . . . . Continue Reading »