Burke, Theologically Speaking

From First Thoughts

In reference to Will’s particularity-and-truth thread, Helen offers some reflections on Burke that lend themselves so well to speaking theologically that, well, here we go. My familiarity with Burke nowadays is a lot narrower, if deeper, than it was a decade ago, but I can’t really . . . . Continue Reading »

Immanent, Meet Transcendent

From First Thoughts

Very interestingly, over at Text Patterns Alan Jacobs evokes the depth of interdependence between the experience of material conditions and the experience of the imagination. This of course is different from the interdependence of truth and particularity but also similar. . . . . Continue Reading »

Samuel Huntington and Culture

From First Thoughts

“Those who distinguish civil from theological intolerance are, to my mind, mistaken. The two forms are inseparable. It is impossible to live at peace withthose whom we regard as damned; to love them would be to hate God who punishes them: we positively must either reclaim or torment . . . . Continue Reading »

Open Thread on Truth and Particularity

From First Thoughts

We seem to have picked up both our fair share of intelligent, articulate, reasoned commenters and our fair share of trolls here at PoMoCon. I’m interested in getting the takes of all of our readers on the following two passages, both from Frederiek Depoortere’s Christ in Postmodern . . . . Continue Reading »

Family Business

From First Thoughts

?Last year, Richard Skinner and I published an article in a small British journal on the role of families in American national politics. With Caroline Kennedy’s recent “campaign” for the senate seat in New York, we thought this article would be of interest to some of the readers . . . . Continue Reading »

Gothic Horror vs. PoMo Irony

From First Thoughts

The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far. The sciences, each straining in its own direction, have . . . . Continue Reading »