Man, Order, and History

From First Thoughts

Over at the First Principles website Saginaw Valley State University professor Lee Trepanier has a thoughtful essay ( Voegelin and Christianity ) explicating Voegelin’s now famous revision of his project, specifically his rejection, introduced in Order and History: Vol. IV , of the . . . . Continue Reading »

‘Round the Site

From First Thoughts

Nicola Karras’ argument for conservatism leaves traditional partisan rhetoric in the dust: "The more we depend on government, the less connection we have with one another." Her graceful essay is not to be missed. Ladyblog’s Manblogger: Your broken moral compass that always . . . . Continue Reading »

Christianity: Passe, Again?

From First Thoughts

Jeffrey Kripal is the latest professor of religious studies to come out, in good modern style, writing off Christianity (and presumably Judaism) as a pooped-out and poopy old farce for stunted schmucks who worship, in Aldous Huxley’s (Joycean, not Blakean) phrase, "Old Noboddady." . . . . Continue Reading »

Postmodernism and the Great Books

From First Thoughts

Our own Peter Lawler is the James Brown of the blogosphere, the hardest working man in the business. Over at the the Encyclopedia Britannica blog , he argues that a "postmodernism, rightly understood" is essentially a realism that counters our modern tendency towards . . . . Continue Reading »

‘Round the Site, 12/11

From First Thoughts

Alan Jacobs : Stikkin’ it to ya . Apart from being self-satisfied and intellectually shallow , Linda Hirshman misses the real source of inequality between the sexes and adheres to a myopic, one-dimensional view of human flourishing, making it impossible for Hirshman to understand how any . . . . Continue Reading »

Individualism, Secularism, Modernism?

From First Thoughts

Thru Walter Olson at Secular Right , I perused this morning the Buckley-hosted Sharon Statement , "adopted in conference at Sharon, Connecticut, on 11 September 1960." Olson wanted to get this point across: the statement’s choice of language can also be seen as a deft stroke of . . . . Continue Reading »

Thecla, Perpetua, Rosemary, and Thyme

From First Thoughts

One reason I’m so eager to defend "shame culture" is that I think there are spiritual goods to be gained by courting shame. An early Christian story in support of that idea: As Thecla listens to Paul’s preaching through a window of her home, her virginal chastity is already . . . . Continue Reading »