Meeting God As An American

I once wrote a book on the American experiment and the idea of covenant, Time Toward Home. A covenantal understanding of America is distinct from, although not incompatible with, a contractual understanding. Most writing about the American experience, and especially about the American political . . . . Continue Reading »

Law & Unlaw

In the present agonies of the Anglican Communion, and of many other denominations besides, it is almost impossible to avoid labeling each other. Sometimes we assign or adopt labels in a sincere effort to indicate our own or others’ loyalties and identities; sometimes we use labels more . . . . Continue Reading »

Christian-Muslim Crosstalk

Christian and Muslim leaders from around the world met this summer at Yale University for the first of four conferences to discuss “the foundational principles” of the two faiths. The willingness of Islamic authorities to engage in dialogue with their Christian counterparts is, to be sure, . . . . Continue Reading »

What Keeps Us Going

I’ve been discussing themes that will be developed in a forthcoming book, American Babylon: Notes of a Christian Exile . The book, God willing and my complying, will be out in the first part of next year. As you may remember from last week, the subject is living an authentic Christian life . . . . Continue Reading »

Are you Ready?

Before many Christians are ready for the rapture, they apparently have a lot of baggage to unpack. Lucky for them, Daniel Radosh has taken it upon himself to shake out all their dirty laundry. In his recently published book, Rapture Ready! Adventures in the Parallel Universe of Christian Pop . . . . Continue Reading »

The Return of Wendell Willkie

Wendell Willkie is back in the news these days in Indiana, thanks to Mary Beth Dunnichay. She is the youngest American Olympian and the only other famous person to be claimed by Elwood Indiana, population 9,096. Dunnichay is a fifteen-year-old synchronized diver. Willkie was the Republican nominee . . . . Continue Reading »

Cum Mortuis in Lingua Mortua

If you took an opinion poll, you’d probably find that the large majority of America’s Latin professors are fairly standard-issue liberals, politically indistinguishable from the rest of the nation’s academics. But, somewhere along the line, the public praise of Latin seems to have . . . . Continue Reading »