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Heterodox Woman

From the December 2018 Print Edition

The Diversity Delusion:  How Race and Gender Pandering Corrupt the University and Undermine Our Culture by heather mac donald st. martin’s, 288 pages, $28.99 There’s much talk about listening to women’s voices in the present moment, but I wonder if there is much room for heterodox . . . . Continue Reading »

A Moderate Proposal

From the February 2018 Print Edition

Faces of Moderation: The Art of Balance in an Age of Extremesby aurelian craiutupenn, 304 pages, $59.95 Everyone is orthodox to himself.” This famous phrase from Locke’s Letter Concerning Toleration might aptly be rewritten as “Everyone is moderate to himself.” For who really thinks himself . . . . Continue Reading »

Learning to Play

From the October 2016 Print Edition

My piano tuner is well over eighty years old. Each time I call him, I fear I’ll learn that he has died. So far he is still with us, though at each visit a little more white-haired and frailer than before. I worry that he will hurt himself when he lies under the instrument or takes out the . . . . Continue Reading »

Our Need for Privacy

From the Aug/Sept 2015 Print Edition

The new game Cards Against Humanity advertises itself as “a party game for horrible people—despicable and awkward [like] you and your friends.” Its premise is simple. Black cards pose a question like “What did Vin Diesel eat for breakfast?” or an incomplete statement, such as, “After . . . . Continue Reading »

Taking A Life

From the May 2015 Print Edition

Pro: Reclaiming Abortion Rights
 by katha pollitt 
picador, 272 pages, $25 It’s easy to be a charitable reader when you like what a writer is saying. It’s possible even when you don’t agree, if an author is temperate and thoughtful. It’s most difficult when the author is an ideologue . . . . Continue Reading »

Learning in Love

From the April 2014 Print Edition

Over the past few months there has been a marked increase in stories about the decline of the humanities in higher education. Sometimes the coverage emerges from a particular political vantage point: The humanities are dying because they have been corrupted by leftist ideologues. Race, class, and . . . . Continue Reading »

No Happy Harmony

From the October 2013 Print Edition

At least once a semester, a young female student will come to my office with questions about an assignment, and after we have finished our official business, will mention her concerns about the future: whether she should apply to medical school or take the less demanding physician’s assistant . . . . Continue Reading »

On Susan

From the November 2012 Print Edition

Susan was a colleague in Baylor’s Honors College, not exactly a friend, though we were quite friendly. She was reserved and elegant, with a willowy figure all women couldn’t help but envy. She was a fine scholar and a beloved teacher, but she never cultivated a following, eschewing celebrity . . . . Continue Reading »

Life on the Divide

From the June/July 2012 Print Edition

On a typical afternoon, I drop off my eight-year-old daughter and her best friend at ballet lessons and return home to meet my five-year-old son’s friend for a “play date.” Their mothers and I appear to have everything in common. We all order our children’s clothes from the same upscale . . . . Continue Reading »