Peter J. Leithart is President of the Theopolis Institute, Birmingham, Alabama, and an adjunct Senior Fellow at New St. Andrews College. He is author, most recently, of Gratitude: An Intellectual History (Baylor).

RSS Feed

Eucharistic meditation

From Leithart

Thanks to Chris Morris for suggesting this line of thinking about 1 John 2:28-29. 1 John 2:28: Little children, abide in Him, so that when He appears, we may have confidence and not shrink away from Him in shame at His coming. As I’ve emphasized a couple of times this morning, Jesus comes to . . . . Continue Reading »

Baptismal meditation

From Leithart

1 John 3:1: See how great a love the Father has bestowed on us, that we should be called children of God; and such we are. Throughout this passage, John speaks about two different genealogies, two different families, two different kinds of people. On the one hand are those who are children of the . . . . Continue Reading »

Exhortation

From Leithart

We live out the Christian life, John says, between appearances of Christ. He appeared first to remove sin and to loose us from the works of the devil, and He appears again as judge and to transform us into His likeness. But Jesus comes again and again, not just twice. Jesus came through and in the . . . . Continue Reading »

Pomo politics

From Leithart

In 1991, Jody Williams and two other people formed the “International Campaign to Ban Landmines.” During the following six years, the group had entered into a coalition with over 1000 Non-Government Organizations and got 121 nations to sign a treaty to ban landmines, which took effect . . . . Continue Reading »

VISA World

From Leithart

Dee Hock, founder and CEO of VISA Corporation, describes the rise and size of the company: “In 1968 the VISA community was no more than a set of beliefs and a vague concept. In 1970 it was born. Today, twenty-nine years later, its products are created by 22,000 owner-member financial . . . . Continue Reading »

Global corporations

From Leithart

Peter Drucker notes that “the distinction between parent and daughter [companies] is increasingly blurring. In the transnational company, design is done anyplace within the system. Major pharmaceutical companies now have research laboratories in five or six countries, in the United States, . . . . Continue Reading »

Tech Revolution?

From Leithart

We are living through a communications revolution. Maybe: While submarine fiber-optic cable is being laid under the world’s oceans (according to Anderson, it will be “the largest man-made structure in the world”), about 70% of the people in the world have never made a phone call. . . . . Continue Reading »

German Indians

From Leithart

As an example of “cultural hybridization,” Walter Truett Anderson describes the residents of the German village of Roderau, where a number of Germans are fascinated with American Indian culture: “the chief Indian in Roderaui is Gerhard Fischer, who prefers to go by the name of Old . . . . Continue Reading »

Postmodernism = Globalism

From Leithart

Walter Truett Anderson says, “The postmodern condition is not an artistic movement or a cultural fad or an intellectual theory - although it produces all of those and is in some ways defined by them. It is what inevitably happens as people everywhere begin to see that there are many beliefs, . . . . Continue Reading »

Hyper-Cartesians

From Leithart

Walter Truett Anderson suggests that postmoderns may be distinguished from others by the fact that they not only have a culture, but know that they have it. Or, put differently: “You do not choose to be premodern. If you choose, you are at least modern. If you know you are choosing, you are . . . . Continue Reading »