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Aristotle Returns

Neo-Aristotelian Perspectives on Contemporary Science  edited by william m. r. simpson, robert c. koons, and nicholas j. teh  routledge, 352 pages, $140 Raphael’s School of Athens depicts Aristotle and Plato at the center of a group of ancient Greek philosophers modeled on . . . . Continue Reading »

Aristotle on the Spectrum

NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversityby steve silbermanavery, 560 pages, $19The alleged link between vaccination and autism has been thoroughly studied and debunked, but its appeal is understandable. The symptoms of autism typically begin to appear around the same age . . . . Continue Reading »

Overlooked Philosophy

Peter Adamson’s Philosophy in the Hellenistic and Roman Worlds accepts a noble challenge announced in the book’s subtitle: A History of Philosophy without any gaps. It’s an impossible objective, of course. Adamson knows this, but admirably proceeds to outline three areas of philosophy that are often overlooked in the hustle of contemporary academic discourse: “Hellenistic philosophy” (the inheritance of Plato and Aristotle), “late antique philosophy among pagans, and ancient Christian philosophy.”

“Even Mother Nature Has An Agent”

Over the last fifteen years or so I have seen (and been moved by) many of the aspirational/inspirational billboards sponsored by The Foundation for a Better Life, an organization that promotes common-ground character virtues while trying at the same time to avoid being a partisan in our contemporary . . . . Continue Reading »

Necessity of the Good

We are all disciples of ­Aristotle. Whether we realize it or not, whenever we are talking about the Good we are working with ideas that are Aristotelian in origin. We speak of good food and good company, good behavior and good outcomes. These modes of the Good share a basic assumption: The good is . . . . Continue Reading »

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