Get Thee to an Altar

So with a nod to considerations both theological and practical, my main criticism of the argument in Reno’s book, as with the religious right more generally, is not that it’s too Christian, but that it’s not Christian enough. Continue Reading »

Why do Christians Revere Jerusalem?

Apparently, the Times’s staff is so unfamiliar with basic Christian teachings that the Resurrection slips right by them. In this, they are not alone among our mainstream media. I once heard a BBC news announcer refer to Easter as the holiday on which Christians commemorate the death of Jesus. Continue Reading »

A More Perfect Absolutism

It is part of the absurdity of American life that we decide questions of truth under the guise of settling contests of rights. Which means that we decide questions of truth without thinking deeply or even very honestly about them. Thus, while it is obvious to many that we are living through a . . . . Continue Reading »

A Mountain or a Marathon?

In Resurrecting the Idea of a Christian Society, Rusty Reno offers a brilliant, accessible and modestly optimistic take on the possibilities for positive change in our current cultural climate, upon which I offer some modestly pessimistic thoughts. Continue Reading »

The Christian Roots of Soil Stewardship Week

The earth is the Lord’s and the fullness thereof.” That is a truth that gets double billing in the Bible with the Apostle Paul quoting the Psalmist David in his first letter to the Corinthians. But it is a truth that gets short shrift today. We want an unbridled personal autonomy and a . . . . Continue Reading »

Properly Basic

Knowledge and Christian Belief by alvin plantinga eerdmans, 141 pages, $16 D oes God exist? Is it reasonable to believe in God? A common line of thought holds these two questions to be importantly distinct. Since no one has been able to settle the matter of God’s existence one way or another, it . . . . Continue Reading »

Disagreement, charity, and Islam

It was about animosity to Muslims, not theology. That’s what Miroslav Volf claimed in a Washington Post editorial condemning Wheaton College administrators, who are currently investigating a professor who said that Christians and Muslims worship the same God. Ironically, in making this accusation, . . . . Continue Reading »