Euthanizing Children

I guess we should be pleased that the euthanasia death of a seventeen-year-old remains at least mildly controversial. But it is clear that the culture of death, if allowed to progress further, will eventually consider such deaths routine. Continue Reading »

Death Rights

Last year, Canada’s Supreme Court unanimously decided that laws criminalizing assisted suicide are unconstitutional and in violation of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Following the court’s verdict, Canadian Parliament in June 2016 passed a new law according Canadians a right to . . . . Continue Reading »

Catholicism’s Empty Quarter

Québec, a flourishing Catholic region for centuries, is now Catholicism’s empty quarter in the Western Hemisphere. There is no more religiously arid place between the North Pole and Tierra del Fuego; there may be no more religiously arid place on the planet. And it all happened in the blink of an eye. Continue Reading »

Is There No Moral Law?

In point of fact, there is no such thing as theological neutrality, just as there is no such thing as moral neutrality. There are many things, to be sure, both morally and theologically, that the state does well to leave to civil society, neither legislating nor making the basis for legislation. Unfortunately, assisted suicide and euthanasia are not among them. Continue Reading »

​The New Hobbesians

Bill C-14 (now before the Senate) is about to thrust Canada into the brave new world of assisted suicide. The “right to die” has been sold to the public as a triumph for personal autonomy. This rhetoric of individual liberty, however, is belied by the bill’s disregard for the conscience rights of Canadians. Continue Reading »

No Peace with Wicked Law

Those who think an amended C-14, with some regulatory tightening and some provision for religious or conscientious objection, is what even opponents of the bill should now aim at, as the lesser of evils, should think again. Here are some things they should think about:First, C-14 is not a bill to . . . . Continue Reading »