Longing for Lent and Liturgy

The risk is mindless ritualism, but I can’t help but wonder if the benefits are so much  more that the risk worth taking. T’is the season for many blog posts on Lent, but my experience last weekend demands I say something on the topic.Invited to St. George’s Anglican Church in . . . . Continue Reading »

Evangelicalism: What’s In a Name?

In an interesting new e-book by Carl Trueman called The Real Scandal of the Evangelical Mind, Trueman revisits the question originally posed by Mark Noll, but with an emphasis not on the mind of the evangelical, but with the term evangelical itself. Trueman writes,For there to be a scandal of the . . . . Continue Reading »

Corporate Piety over Personal Piety

A couple of days ago I did a post called “Why Love the Church” wherein I analogized from some words of G. K. Chesterton to the effect that we ought to love the church simply because she is the church, the bride of Christ and mother of the faithful.   In that quote Chesterton . . . . Continue Reading »

Why Love the Church

As I’ve hopscotched around the internet the last month I’ve come across a G. K. Chesterton quote that offers some wisdom in how we relate to the church.  He is speaking of his love for England, but the love he shows for England here is a terrific example of the love we can and . . . . Continue Reading »

Neighbor Love and the Doctrine of God

It’s confusing yet strangely gratifying all at the same time. We live in a culture that is moving further and further from the exclusive claims of Christianity yet almost equally—and inconsistently—holds select passages in the Bible in high regard. They hold forth as though they . . . . Continue Reading »

Know Your Evangelicals: John Piper

Name: John PiperWhy you’ve heard of him: Dr. Piper is one of the most influential and popular preacher/authors in American evangelicalism.Position: Senior Pastor of Bethlehem Baptist Church in Minneapolis, MN; Host of the daily radio program Desiring God; Founder of Desiring God . . . . Continue Reading »

The Problem of Moral Revival

As a Christian and a conservative, I believe we have reached a crossroads where we need to seriously reconsider our approach to cultural engagement. The swift undercurrent of moral decay continues to take most Christians by surprise while our pragmatic approach to morality rooted in tradition and . . . . Continue Reading »