Death by Presidential Order

Conor Friedersdorf asks about the president’s kill list, drones, and Abdulrahman al-Awlaki, 16 years old and an American citizen, who was the son of the late Anwar al-Awlaki, who was also born in America, who was also an American citizen, and who was also killed by drone.  There is a . . . . Continue Reading »

Who Needs You?

The interesting thing about writing on a blog with men is that the woman writing knows that some things that concern them are incomprehensible to her and that some things she will write about will be incomprehensible to them.  I never feel so sensitive about that as when I want to write about . . . . Continue Reading »

A Little Bit about Memorial Day

I have heard it said that if you do not have family, close family, serving in the military, then your attitude toward government, and especially U.S. involvement in war and military conflict, will be quite different from those of us in that position.  On Memorial Day, theoretically, we come . . . . Continue Reading »

Grateful: For a Loving, Committed Family

I love the television show Heroes on NBC.  My wife and I got addicted to the program via Netflix and have made it appointment viewing ever since.  Lately, the show, which began with straightforward characters and easily understandable models of nobility, has become more complicated.Noah, a . . . . Continue Reading »

The Complementarity of Man and Woman

The brilliant lay philosopher of Judaism, Dennis Prager, has written lucidly about the utter distinctiveness of Judaism among the nations of its time in its understanding of human sexuality. Prager writes: The gods of virtually all civilizations engaged in sexual relations. In the Near East, the . . . . Continue Reading »

Between Father and Daughter

Galileo's Daughter: A Historical Memoir of Science, Faith, and Loveby dava sobelwalker and company, 432 pages, $27 The first two terms of Dava Sobel’s subtitle—science and faith—inevitably suggest conflicts to us moderns. Yet, for the preeminent scientists of the seventeenth . . . . Continue Reading »

When Families Fail

Perhaps the most striking feature of our contemporary political landscape is the failure of the tattered labels “liberal” and “conservative” any longer to convey useful distinctions. In my own field of education policy, for example, those who get called conservative are in fact deeply . . . . Continue Reading »

What Families Are For

In his engagingly titled book, What’s Wrong With the World, G. K. Chesterton argued that his fellow citizens could not repair the defects of the family because they had no ideal at which to aim. Neither the Tory (Gudge) nor the Socialist (Hudge) had an ideal that viewed the family as sacred, an . . . . Continue Reading »