Don't Kill the Moon

The long-running British sci-fi staple Doctor Who has quietly become one of the most pro-life shows on television. Under the tenure of showrunner Steven Moffat, there has been a strong pro-life subtext for several seasons of Doctor Who. Even before Moffat took the reins of the show, he wrote a pair . . . . Continue Reading »

The Parenting Problems of Age Segregation

It has been more than a half-century since James Coleman and his team surveyed students in ten high schools to determine their values and interests and attitudes toward learning. The conclusion was that a new social formation was upon us: the adolescent society. That was the title of the book . . . . Continue Reading »

The Conservative Pop Culture Gap

Over at Powerline, an interesting post and a more interesting thread on whether conservatives can close the “Pop Culture Gap.” One guy even laments that the Republicans blew by not taking the book South Park Conservatives to heart! So, apparently the day of vindication of Paul Cantor , . . . . Continue Reading »

Debt, Gift, and Sacrifice in the Hunger Games

The book, The Hunger Games, is of course better than the movie. The book’s story moves with the internal dialogue of the teen protagonist, Katniss. In contrast, the film’s story moves along through events external to Katniss. As a result of this shift, the film throws away our window into Katniss’s mind and, significantly, into her moral psychology, both of which are by far the most engaging part of the book (and the entire trilogy of books for that matter)… . Continue Reading »

The Orthodox Jew as Intellectual Crank

My subject is “The Orthodox Jew as Intellectual Crank,” and it would be best if I began with some definitions. My dictionary defines a crank as an “ill-tempered, grouchy person,” as an “eccentric person who is overzealous in his advocacy of a private cause.” By these standards, Baruch . . . . Continue Reading »