The Annunciation of Our Lord

From First Thoughts

This day rightly should be known as the Incarnation of Our Lord, for on this day we remember and thank God for the fact that He sent His Son into this fallen world of ours, to redeem us and save us from our sins. This dramatic rescue-operation starts with a visit to the Most Blessed Virgin, Mary, . . . . Continue Reading »

Happy Birthday Dear Sebastian!

From First Thoughts

[caption id=”attachment_5721” align=”aligncenter” width=”480” caption=”Happy 325th Birthday Kantor Bach!”][/caption]Our beloved fifth evangelist was born on this day in 1685. Since many male relatives in Bach time shared a common first name: fathers, . . . . Continue Reading »

Top Books

From First Thoughts

So, here’s my list. Of course, the Holy Scriptures remain the most important “book” in my life, but that’s a given, so, next, in order, and it is extremely difficult to name only a handful, since there are so many books that have had a profound influence on my life, these are . . . . Continue Reading »

Feast of St. Joseph, Guardian of Our Lord

From First Thoughts

Scripture Readings2 Samuel 7:4-16Romans 4:13-18Matthew 2:13-15; 2:19-23We pray:Almighty God, from the house of Your servant David You raised up Joseph to be the guardian of Your incarnate Son and the husband of His mother, Mary. Grant us grace to follow the example of this faithful workman in . . . . Continue Reading »

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

From First Thoughts

As an Irishman, on my father’s side, I’m very pleased to celebrate Saint Patrick’s day as the day to honor the one who was instrumental in bringing the Gospel to my ancestoral people and home. Here from “Crosstalk.com” is the real story of Saint Patrick:If you ask . . . . Continue Reading »

Laetare: The Fourth Sunday in Lent

From First Thoughts

The study of how traditions developed surrounding the Church Year is fascinating. This Sunday in Lent is traditionally known as “Laetare” Sunday. Here’s an explanation of how this came to be called the Sunday of Joy, in the middle of Lent. The traditional/classic vestments worn by . . . . Continue Reading »