Till We Have Faces

From First Thoughts

The Fall, 2013 issue of  Leadership Journal  has an article by Stanton Jones up entitled, ” Help, I’m Gay .” It is billed as “A pastoral conversation about same-sex attraction.” The editors chose to illustrate the article with the picture at left. This would . . . . Continue Reading »

The Question of Truth

From First Thoughts

In his excellent posts from Monday ( Celibacy Is Not the Gospel  and  Celibacy in Light of the Resurrection ), Wes attempted to respond to the following concern: “If we’re going to ask gay Christians to give up gay sex, that self-denial must be demonstrably  good  for . . . . Continue Reading »

Arduous Goods

From First Thoughts

Celibacy has a kind of  duck-rabbit  quality, at least in my experience. If you catch me in one mood, and ask me what celibacy is like, I will be inclined to point out that one needs to be honest about the struggles and frustrations that go with it, and recognize how difficult a burden . . . . Continue Reading »

C. S Lewis: Talking about Bicycles

From First Thoughts

One of the common criticisms of a traditionally Christian sexual ethic is that it forces a lot of gay people into  involuntary celibacy , which some find very lonely, painful, frustrating. I want to start by saying I think this critique is at least partially right. Trying to be faithful to a . . . . Continue Reading »

“You Don’t Have to Be Gay”?

From First Thoughts

In contemporary culture, “gay” is the most common word for describing homosexual persons. This has become so much a part of the default language that  Pope Francis used it as a neutral description of a person’s sexual attractions  in response to a question at a recent . . . . Continue Reading »

Celibacy and Healing

From First Thoughts

When I was an undergraduate, I read two of the most important ex-gay books of the time:  Coming Out of Homosexuality   by Bob Davies and Lori Rentzel, and  Straight & Narrow?   by Thomas Schmidt. Coming out of Homosexuality  was 208 pages long, and offered three . . . . Continue Reading »