In today’s second ” On The Square ” column, Gerald Hiestand, an evangelical pastor, describes a uniquely modern Christian dilemma: the unsettling schism between pastors and theologians. While the history of Christianity encourages the view that pastor and theologian are part of the same vocation, modern times have seen unprecedented division:

Historically, the church’s most influential theologians were church men—pastors, priests, and bishops. Clerics such as Athanasius, Augustine (indeed, nearly all the church Fathers), Anselm, Luther, Calvin, Zwingli, Edwards, and Wesley functioned as the wider theologians of their day—shaping not only the theological vision of their own parishes, but that of the wider church. In their day, the pastoral community represented the most influential, most insightful, and most articulate body of theologians.

But since the nineteenth-century (in North America, at least) the center of theological reflection has shifted from the parish to the university. The pastoral community is no longer called upon—as a matter of vocation—to construct theology for those beyond their congregations. Instead, our present context views the academy as the proper home for those with theological gifts. Those with shepherding gifts are directed toward the pastorate. And those who are gifted in both areas? Well, they’ll have to choose. But can this be right? Do we really mean to suggest that the proper home of a theologian is in the academy, disconnected from the pastoral vocation?

Articles by Kevin Staley-Joyce

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