Swinburne’s A Priori Errors

Following a great Christian tradition going back to the early apologists themselves, Richard Swinburne, in Was Jesus God? (Oxford University Press, 2008), takes up the noble and praiseworthy enterprise of providing rational arguments for accepting not only the truth that Jesus is truly God but also . . . . Continue Reading »

Marchons à March!

If you’re looking for something new to vary the grinding winter sameness, the March issue of First Things will be of no use. In it you’ll find nothing but what you’ve come to expect: just another Pentecostal outbreak of intellect and eloquence applied to the highest matters of current . . . . Continue Reading »

Cold-Blooded Christianity

To scan the popular Christian publications today is to conclude that the category of heresy has not been lost, but it has been relocated. The new anathema is “cultural Christianity.” “Missional Christians” disparage it. The supposed demise of Christendom is the rallying cry of . . . . Continue Reading »

The Attack of the Machines

We all know the story. Whether we’ve seen it at the movies, heard it on the radio, or read it in a book, we’ve all been exposed at one point or another to a variation on the same dystopian nightmare: the attack of the machines.One version plays out far away, in some cold, dark corner of . . . . Continue Reading »

The Anglicans in Egypt: A Deeper Communion

“Are we a global church, or are we a federation of local bodies?” At the close of last week’s meeting of the Anglican primates in Egypt, the Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams thus set forth the great looming question that Anglicanism has been asking itself for the last . . . . Continue Reading »

Death By Bailout

Barack Obama’s announcement of restrictions on executive pay gets it just right. Last week the White House issued regulations limiting compensation for the top brass of companies being bailed out to $500,000 per year, along with a variety of warnings about the luxury goodies that cronies on . . . . Continue Reading »

Saving What Can Be Saved

In May 2006, the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) made public its decision to “invite” Fr. Marcial Maciel, founder of the religious order the Legion of Christ and the lay movement Regnum Christi, to “a reserved life of penitence and prayer, relinquishing any form of . . . . Continue Reading »