The Nomination Debate

From First Thoughts

A week ago, the White House confirmed President Obama’s intentions to “fulfill his constitutional responsibility to nominate a successor to Justice Scalia.” The President echoed those words a day later, promising to provide the Senate with an “indisputably qualified” nominee. For their . . . . Continue Reading »

Uncovering the History of the Abortion Debate

From Web Exclusives

On the 40th anniversary of Roe v. Wade, the Supreme Court’s 1973 decision legalizing abortion, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg announced her misgivings about the ruling. As a distinguished champion of what the left euphemistically calls “reproductive rights,” Justice Ginsburg was never going to critique the decision on moral grounds; the problem for Ginsburg, rather, was tactical. In her eyes, by running ahead of the people, the now-infamous 1973 decision gave “opponents of access to abortion a target to aim at relentlessly.”