Support First Things by turning your adblocker off or by making a  donation. Thanks!

Letters

From the April 2020 Print Edition

Theodore Dalrymple (“Identity as Ideology,” February) is certainly correct to point to the yearning for transcendence that was not—and likely cannot be—obliterated in people like André Hébert when they lose the will to enter into communion with the traditional means of attaining . . . . Continue Reading »

Briefly Noted

From the April 2020 Print Edition

In September 1944, Helmuth von Moltke sat in Berlin’s Tegel prison, awaiting execution. The Nazis had arrested him for organizing the ­Kreisau Circle, a resistance group formed to plan a more democratic future Germany. Helmuth’s death drew near, yet, as his wife Freya wrote to him, “The best . . . . Continue Reading »

Letters

From the March 2020 Print Edition

Patricia Snow (“Hawthorne’s Daughter,” January) may perhaps be ­unaware of St. Jerome’s error in countering Jovinian’s heresy, namely, his denigration of marriage in order to uphold the superiority of the virgin state. Snow makes Jerome’s mistake in her attempt to rationalize Rose . . . . Continue Reading »

Briefly Noted

From the March 2020 Print Edition

In The River of the Immaculate Conception, James Matthew Wilson confirms his vocation as a public poet. Commissioned by the Benedict XVI Institute, this poem sequence of seven parts leads us through the lives of St. Juan Diego, St. ­Elizabeth Ann Seton, and Père Marquette, with interludes on . . . . Continue Reading »

Letters

From the February 2020 Print Edition

I don’t suppose it will be easy for Carl Trueman (“Turning Inward,” December 2019) and me to avoid talking past each other, but let’s give it a try. My book, The Meaning of Protestant Theology, is not an effort to engage with secondary literature. (Gerhard Forde? Never read him; don’t . . . . Continue Reading »

Letters

From the January 2020 Print Edition

Darel E. Paul offers an elegant explication of Eric Kaufmann’s complex ethno-political projection of the future (“The Future is Mixed,” November 2019). However, I fear his use of Pierre Manent’s analysis is overbroad and muddles his attempt at pointing a way forward. For example, there’s . . . . Continue Reading »

Briefly Noted

From the January 2020 Print Edition

The beloved evangelist ­Billy ­Graham (1918–2018) preach­ed the gospel face to face to more people than any other figure in history. During his lengthy career, more than three million individuals placed their faith in Jesus by confessing their sins and asking Christ to be their Savior and Lord. . . . . Continue Reading »

Letters

From the December 2019 Print Edition

Sohrab Ahmari correctly identifies many of the pathologies haunting liberal order in the West (“The New American Right,” October), which some on the right have been reluctant to acknowledge. Indeed, more conservatives should be challenging the fragile premises of the . . . . Continue Reading »