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Letters

From the October 2022 Print Edition

Russell A. Berman’s essay (“State of Emergency,” June/July) about our nation’s instability in various areas of public life is an insightful and valuable analysis of the fraying of the social bonds that hold together our multi-racial, multi-ethnic nation. There is one sentence, however, that . . . . Continue Reading »

Briefly Noted

From the October 2022 Print Edition

At a theology conference some months ago, I mentioned to a friend that, although I think Karl Barth’s doctrine of the Word of God is one of modern theology’s great triumphs, academic “Barthianism” seemed to me a dead end. My friend walked me over to an eminent Barth scholar, who promptly . . . . Continue Reading »

Letters

From the Aug/Sept Issue 2022 Print Edition

Wokeism in Court I should begin by congratulating Frank Resartus on his excellent essay “Defeating the Equity ­Regime” (May). Resartus believes “conventional right-wing jurisprudence” on “just a handful of constitutional questions” could “defeat the [­equity] regime altogether.” . . . . Continue Reading »

Letters

From the June/July 2022 Print Edition

Cassandra Nelson’s “A Theo­logy of Fiction” (April) is a welcome intervention and advance in an ­ongoing conversation that, as ­Nelson herself notes, I’ve been invested in for some time. Nelson’s attentiveness to the work of Sr. Mariella Gable—and her related readings of a series . . . . Continue Reading »

Letters

From the May 2022 Print Edition

Forgotten Islam  Gabriel Said Reynold’s review of Mustafa Akyol’s book, Reopening Muslim Minds, makes fascinating reading (“Liberal Islam,” March). Instead of focusing on what is wrong with Islam, Akyol calls Muslims back to forgotten graces and truths in the Islamic tradition. Akyol . . . . Continue Reading »

Briefly Noted

From the May 2022 Print Edition

Andrew Willard Jones follows his masterful study of the “sacramental kingdom” of Louis IX with this sweeping historiography of the Church, from its foundations in Eden up to the present moment. The plot assumes that Christianity is in fact true and that the protagonist is the Church. He opens . . . . Continue Reading »

Letters

From the April 2022 Print Edition

East and West In his memoirs of growing up in the U.S.S.R., Wolfgang Leonhard recalled how he and his mother, a German Marxist-Leninist, emigrated from Germany to the communist paradise. When they looked for a map of Moscow, their new home, they found only useless, outdated ones and official plans . . . . Continue Reading »

Letters

From the March 2022 Print Edition

Union and Absolution Mark Bauerlein, in his insightful piece “A Less Perfect Union” (January), states that the “Southern generals became idols after the war, and rightly so.” Lee and ­Jackson were far superior to the Union generals, especially in the first years of the war. His comments, . . . . Continue Reading »

Briefly Noted

From the March 2022 Print Edition

From the opening declaration that “biblical interpretation is not a historical discipline,” it is clear that Hans Boersma is addressing scholars committed to viewing the Bible as Scripture. Many biblical scholars do not share this commitment, and many who do were not trained in graduate school . . . . Continue Reading »

Letters

From the February 2022 Print Edition

Philip Pilkington’s provocative essay, “Generation Against Generation” (December), portrays capitalist countries ripped apart by tensions generated by low fertility and an aging population. He contributes some interesting insights, some highly debatable conclusions, and a number of . . . . Continue Reading »