Letters

From the December 2017 Print Edition

CONTEMPT OF COURT James Nuechterlein (“Remembering Peter Berger,” October) feels that the 1996 First Things symposium on the judicial usurpation of politics was inappropriate because it cast doubts on the legitimacy of American political order. As it is, however, the problem is still with us. If . . . . Continue Reading »

Letters

From the November 2017 Print Edition

BURNING BRIDGES I would like to thank First Things for the kind invitation to respond to Fr. Paul Mankowski’s review of my book Building a Bridge (“Pontifex Minimus,” August/September). Sadly, I found the review almost entirely divorced from the experience of the majority of LGBT Catholics in . . . . Continue Reading »

Briefly Noted

From the November 2017 Print Edition

John Witherspoon’s American Revolution:  Enlightenment and Religion from the Creation of Britain to the Founding of the United States by gideon mailer university of north carolina, 440 pages, $45 Were John Witherspoon living today, he would be a regular contributor to First . . . . Continue Reading »

Letters

From the October 2017 Print Edition

SACRAMENTS, NOT SWEETS James Zacchaeus’s story (“Thanks for Everything, Pope Francis,” June/July) is a testimony to what can result when a Catholic couple treats Christ’s commandments on marriage as divine guidance requiring obedience for their own good rather than an unachievable ideal . . . . Continue Reading »

Briefly Noted

From the October 2017 Print Edition

Luther and His Progeny: 500 Years of Protestantism and Its Consequences for Church, State, and Society edited by john c. rao angelico, 290 pages, $19.95 This collection of twelve essays tracks the long shadow cast by Martin Luther on modern society over the past five centuries. Addressing a range of . . . . Continue Reading »

Letters

From the Aug/Sept 2017 Print Edition

R. R. Reno is sympathetic to nationalism because he sees it as a reaction against disenchantment (“Return of the Strong Gods,” May). While I agree that “the banishment of love from our politics is creating the populism that presently troubles us,” it doesn’t strike me that this populism . . . . Continue Reading »