Support First Things by turning your adblocker off or by making a  donation. Thanks!

Letters

From the December 2020 Print Edition

Catesby Leigh notes in his essay “Monumental Contrast” (October) that the removal of the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial in New York City is a sign that the “monumental aesthetic” in public art is an “endangered species.” Those of us in the art world know only too well that in civic art the . . . . Continue Reading »

Briefly Noted

From the December 2020 Print Edition

The Love That Is God:An Invitation to Christian Faithby frederick christian bauerschmidt eerdmans, 147 pages, $18.99 Bauerschmidt has the heart of an evangelist. The Love That Is God reads like a manifesto for those jaded by the Christian faith, in which Bauerschmidt insists that the God of the . . . . Continue Reading »

Letters

From the November 2020 Print Edition

In “Why I Am a Baptist” (August/September), Dr. R. Albert Mohler Jr. inadvertently gives the impression that Southern Baptists came together in 1845 in order to “establish mission boards and organize evangelism.” To those not intimate with the details of Baptist history, this could be . . . . Continue Reading »

Letters

From the October 2020 Print Edition

I much appreciated Nathaniel Peters’s discussion of spiritual communion through the lens of William of Saint-Thierry (“Spiritual Communion,” June/July). The focus on the fact that the Eucharist does its work, after all, through God’s action (that is, the Holy Spirit) and not our own is a . . . . Continue Reading »

Briefly Noted

From the October 2020 Print Edition

A Time to Die:Monks on the Threshold of Eternal Lifeby nicolas diat ignatius, 174 pages, $17.95 Nicolas Diat is a French journalist most famous for his interviews with Cardinal Robert Sarah. In this book, he visits flourishing monasteries in France to talk with monks about death. A Time to Die, . . . . Continue Reading »

Letters

From the Aug/Sept 2020 Print Edition

After reading Douglas Farrow’s “The Secret of the Saeculum” (May), I found myself unsure of how to understand it. Take, for instance, the following striking passage: Our age is a very definite age, a very well-defined age, precisely because it is bracketed by the first and second comings of . . . . Continue Reading »

Letters

From the June/July 2020 Print Edition

In “Professors as Propagandists” (April), Alexander Riley systematically misrepresents my 2018 book, How Fascism Works. If this were my only objection, I would not be writing this letter. There is a substantial moral and political disagreement brought out by his piece. I would be remiss to . . . . Continue Reading »

Briefly Noted

From the June/July 2020 Print Edition

Tyll: A Novel by daniel kehlmann, translated by ross benjamin pantheon, 352 pages, $26.95 Daniel Kehlmann’s novel Tyll, like its title character, is full of dark surprises. Tyll ­Ulenspiegel, a legendary figure from German folklore, is a prankster, magician, and traveling performer. Throughout . . . . Continue Reading »