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In an apparent attempt to disrupt communication among protestors, the Egyptian government shut off the country’s Internet access :

Internet access was shut down across the country shortly after midnight. Mobile phone text messaging services also appeared to be partially disabled, working only sporadically.

Activists have relied on the Internet, especially social media services like Twitter and Facebook, to organize.

U.S. State Department spokesman P.J. Crowley said in a “tweet” message on Twitter: “We are concerned that communications services, including the Internet, social media, and even this tweet are being blocked in Egypt.”

A page on Facebook social networking site listed more than 30 mosques and churches where protesters were expected gather.

“Egypt’s Muslims and Christians will go out to fight against corruption, unemployment and oppression and absence of freedom.”


Here is a photo of an Egyptian demonstrator taking on riot police Superman-style during the recent anti-government protests in Cairo. This is exactly how I would react if the government turned off my access to the Internet.

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