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Matthew Schmitz is senior editor of First Things. His writing has appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Spectator, the Catholic Herald, and other publications. He holds an A.B. in English from Princeton University. You can follow him on Twitter and Facebook.

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Mary Among Evangelicals

From the November 2018 Print Edition

When I was three years old, I asked my pregnant mother whether Jesus could come into me as my baby brother had come into her. It was my inept way of saying that I wanted to accept Jesus into my heart as my personal lord and savior, an idea to which my Evangelical church had already introduced me. . . . . Continue Reading »

Cultural Realpolitik

From the Aug/Sept 2018 Print Edition

On a clear June day in 2017, two million people lined the route of the New York ­Pride Parade to cheer as floats sponsored by Deutsche Telekom, Nissan, Facebook, and Toronto-Dominion Bank went by. Marchers wearing #Resistance T-shirts led the way, followed by ranks of New York’s Finest marching . . . . Continue Reading »

Portals of the Past

From the June/July 2018 Print Edition

When the Sight & Sound poll—the oldest and most prestigious film ranking—declared in 2012 that Vertigo was the greatest film ever made, Armond White denounced the film’s admirers for their “obsessive interest in pathology and soullessness.” James Wolcott dismissed the . . . . Continue Reading »

Catholic Imagination and Its Counterfeit

From Web Exclusives

A few hours before the Met Gala began, Cardinal Dolan stood opposite the Temple of Dendur and proclaimed Christ. He was there for the press preview of the new exhibit “Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination.” Men in Rome had sent the sacred relics of several holy popes for display . . . . Continue Reading »

Neuhaus Was Right

From the January 2018 Print Edition

As the Berlin Wall fell, Francis Fukuyama proclaimed the end of history—“the universalization of Western liberal democracy as the final form of human government.” Richard John Neuhaus wasn’t so sure. In a 1996 symposium on judicial overreach, he questioned the . . . . Continue Reading »