Look at Their Democracy

In the three centuries since the prince-elector of Hanover became George I of Great Britain, few power brokers have been more detached from the populace they affected than Rabbi Menachem Shach (1898–2001). Born and bred in Lithuania, where he devoted himself to Talmudic study with some of the . . . . Continue Reading »

​Benedict Option

There’s something very right about Rod Dreher’s call to action in The Benedict Option: A Strategy for Christians in a Post-Christian Nation. He urges us to ask if we have “compromised too much with the world” and suggests ways to renew the integrity of our religious communities. Yet . . . . Continue Reading »

Pilgrims of Progress

America’s national epic was not written in meter and verse. Nor, for that matter, was it written by an American. Yet The Pilgrim’s Progress is nonetheless the primal American story, the account of our mad flight from order and lonely quest for grace. Hemmed in by civilization, resentful of kin, . . . . Continue Reading »

Kink is Not Conscience

Trying to argue for intellectual diversity and good faith by sticking up for kink is like trying to get high-school students excited about reading Romeo and Juliet by comparing it to Fifty Shades of Grey—it’s not just ridiculous, but dishonest. Continue Reading »

Anti-Christianity in France

French aversion to Christianity shows up in the half-repentant Marxist left, but can also be found on the extreme right, with its mystique that despises love and mercy, and among centrists whose moderation assimilates faith to fanaticism. Continue Reading »