Greg Kandra once praised the fittingness and beauty of standing to receive communion. Now he thinks it’s time to bring back the communion rail :

Two years ago, I rhapsodized on the  Feast of Corpus Christi  on the theology behind standing to receive communion, and defended it. And why not? I’ve received that way for most of my adult life; I even remember the Latin church’s experiment with intinction back in the ’70s. Standing and in-the-hand always seemed to me sensible, practical and—with proper catechesis—appropriate.


But now, after several years of standing on the other side of the ciborium—first as an Extraordinary Minister of Holy Communion, now as a deacon—and watching what goes on, I’ve had about enough . . . .


I’m reminded week after week that people have no uniform way to receive in the hand. There’s the reverent “hands-as-throne” approach; there’s the “Gimme five,” one-hand-extended style; there are the notorious “body snatchers” who reach up and seize the host to pop into their mouths like an after-dinner mint; and there are the vacillating undecideds who approach with hands slightly cupped and lips parted. Where do you want it and how?? . . .


The fact is, we fumbling humans  need  external reminders—whether smells and bells, or postures and gestures—to reinforce what we are doing, direct our attention, and make us  get over  ourselves. Receiving communion is about something above us, and beyond us. It should transcend what we normally do. But what does it say about the state of our worship and our reception of the Eucharist that it has begun to resemble a trip to the DMV? . . .


Can kneeling to receive on the tongue help alleviate some of this? Well, it can’t hurt. And for this reason: to step up to a communion rail, and kneel, and receive on the tongue, is an act of utter and unabashed humility. In that posture to receive the Body of Christ, you become  less  so that you can then become  more . It requires a submission of will and clear knowledge of what you are doing, why you are doing it, and what is about to happen to you.

Articles by Matthew Schmitz

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