Reading the Signs

From the October 2007 Print Edition

Church Signs Across America by Steve and Pam Paulson Overlook, 162 pages, $19.95 Bible Road: Signs of Faith in the American Landscape by Sam Fentress David & Charles, 159 pages, $29.99 I will always remember the day I discovered the concept of irony—not the word; that would come much later. . . . . Continue Reading »

In Search of Eden

From the February 2007 Print Edition

Mapping Paradise: A History of Heaven on Earth by Alessandro Scafi University of Chicago Press, 400 pages, $55 Looking through the many and lavish illustrations of Alessandro Scafi’s Mapping Paradise: A History of Heaven on Earth, I find myself drawn again and again to a photograph reproduced . . . . Continue Reading »

The Code Breakers

From the August/September 2006 Print Edition

A few years ago, I wrote an essay in praise of the Harry Potter books that yielded some interesting responses. One man, knowing that I am a Christian, wrote in some astonishment: Did I not see that the books symbolically describe an alchemy-based paganism, a model of magical power deeply hostile to . . . . Continue Reading »

To Be a Christian College

From the April 2006 Print Edition

In 1877 some concerned citizens of Wheaton, Illinois, decided that they needed to do something about the strange little college that stood in the midst of their town. It had been there since the early 1850s, first as a Wesleyan school called the Illinois Institute and then—reinvented by Jonathan . . . . Continue Reading »

A Bible for Everyone

From the December 2003 Print Edition

One summer years ago, I attended a conference that met at Princeton Theological Seminary; we participants stayed in the seminary dormitory. We soon discovered that the lounge on the first floor of the dorm had been converted into a kind of outsized study. A large table dominated the room; scattered . . . . Continue Reading »

C. S. Lewis Then and Now

From the March 2002 Print Edition

Wesley Kort’s C. S. Lewis Then and Now is extraordinarily puzzling. It contains many fresh and valuable insights about Lewis, but my overall response is to wonder why Kort would choose to enlist Lewis in a project of cultural restoration that seems thoroughly alien to Lewis’ whole body of . . . . Continue Reading »