Blinded by Nostalgia

From Web Exclusives

The twenty-first century has been a time of transition in American life. In our economy, our culture, our politics, and throughout our society, longstanding norms seem to be breaking down. Times of uneasy transition are often characterized by a politics of nostalgia for the peak of the passing order, and ours most definitely is. Continue Reading »

Taking the Long Way

From the October 2014 Print Edition

And it came to pass, when Pharaoh had let the people go, that God did not lead them through the land of the Philistines, even though it was nearer. —Exodus 13:17 For many decades now, America’s political life has been divided between people who call themselves “conservatives” and people . . . . Continue Reading »

A Pessimistic Case for Hope

From Web Exclusives

Ten years ago this fall, it seemed for a moment like social conservatives might be ascendant in our politics. Immediately after the 2004 election, some analysts on the right and left alike said George W. Bush’s reelection signaled a rising tide of “values voters” who would yield an enduring nationwide advantage for Republicans on social issues. Continue Reading »

After Progressivism

From the May 2012 Print Edition

“After Progressivism” is one of three addresses given to a symposium on “After Liberalism,” put on in late February with the support of the Simon/Hertog Fund for Policy Analysis and of Fieldstead and Company. The following is a response to Wilfred M. McClay’s . . . . Continue Reading »

Nothing to See Here

From the June/July 2010 Print Edition

Whatever happened to bioethics? The decade between the cloning of Dolly the sheep and the election of Barack Obama was rife with heated public arguments about embryo research, cloning, assisted reproduction, and other matters bioethical. President George W. Bush’s first prime-time speech was . . . . Continue Reading »

Another Stem Cell Advance

From First Thoughts

The announcement in November of 2006 that researchers in the United States and Japan had succeeded in turning skin cells into what appeared to be the equivalent of embryonic stem cells transformed the landscape of stem cell science, and the related ethical debate. If Democrats in Washington ever . . . . Continue Reading »

Biotech: What to Expect

From the March 2009 Print Edition

Over the past fifteen years, the pro-life movement has succeeded in enacting some modest limitations on embryo-destructive research. Passage of these depended heavily on Republican control of the Congress, and their defense in the past eight years depended heavily on a Republican president willing . . . . Continue Reading »