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Our Socialist Moment

The Socialist Manifesto:  The Case for Radical Politics in an Era of Extreme Inequality by bhaskar sunkara basic, 288 pages, $28 In the spring of 2019, even the staid old AFL-CIO began to dabble in guillotine imagery. The occasion was a dispute between Delta and the International Association of . . . . Continue Reading »

Specter of the Beatitudes

Workers’ Tales:  Socialist Fairy Tales, Fables, and Allegories from Great Britain edited by michael rosen princeton, 328 pages, $19.95 When I was a girl, I had a picture book, The Day the Fairies Went on Strike. This 1981 confection by Linda Briskin and Maureen FitzGerald, with . . . . Continue Reading »

Russian Jeremiah

Between Two Millstones, Book 1: Sketches of Exile, 1974–1978 by aleksandr solzhenitsyn notre dame, 480 pages, $35 The first volume of Solzhenitsyn’s memoir of exile, Between Two Millstones, begins with the author’s expulsion from the Soviet Union and closes with him viewing the landscape . . . . Continue Reading »

Champagne for All

A Scent of Champagne: 8,000 Champagnes Tasted and Rated by richard juhlinskyhorse publishing, 400 pages, $95 Lord Keynes regretted very little, but he once confided to Noel Annan that he wished he had drunk more champagne. As with most of his pronouncements that did not touch directly upon questions . . . . Continue Reading »

Waiting for St. Vladimir

Alasdair MacIntyre, who is probably the greatest living philosopher, concludes his 1981 masterwork After Virtue by saying, “We are waiting not for a Godot, but for another—doubtless very different—St. Benedict.” In that book MacIntyre argues that a correct understanding of morality is based . . . . Continue Reading »

What Is Left of Socialism

Karl Marx—a powerful mind, a very learned man, and a good German writer—died 119 years ago. He lived in the age of steam; never in his life did he see a car, a telephone, or an electric light, to say nothing of later technological devices. His admirers and followers used to say and some keep . . . . Continue Reading »

Utopian Passions

“Workers of the world . . . forgive me.”   —Graffiti on a statue of Karl Marx Moscow, August 1991 The monuments have fallen now; the faces are changed. In the graveyards the martyrs have been rehabilitated, and everywhere the names are restored. In a revolutionary . . . . Continue Reading »

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