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Catholic Zionism

In 1965, in Nostra Aetate, the Second Vatican Council affirmed that God’s covenant with the Jewish people is irrevocable. Lumen Gentium had done the same the year before, concurring with what St. Paul says about biblical Judaism in Romans 11:29 (“For the gifts and the call of God . . . . Continue Reading »

How Christianity
Changed Singleness

Americans increasingly live alone. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the single-person household is now the second-most-common living arrangement in the country, encompassing more than a quarter of Americans. Living alone is among the risk factors for loneliness and premature mortality. . . . . Continue Reading »

Puritanism Then and Now

When Greta Thunberg, the teenage Green activist, crossed the Atlantic last summer to address the United Nations, one could hear echoes of the pilgrim voyagers of the seventeenth century. Thunberg’s speech to the General Assembly, including the tears shed both by the speaker and by the devoted . . . . Continue Reading »

Sincerity is Not Self-Knowledge

Teshuva means return, and return in the ­Hebrew Bible and the Jewish legal tradition means return to God. It is the word for repentance. Some prominent modern Jewish thinkers have used the term teshuva to refer to the individual or the community’s return to itself. The list . . . . Continue Reading »

The Individualist

On February 2, 2018, seven members of a group called Bristol Antifascists assembled outside a lecture hall at the University of the West of England in Bristol. They donned balaclavas or dark glasses, according to taste, and entered through the double doors at the back of the hall. “No platform for . . . . Continue Reading »

Atwood's False Testament

“Novels are not slogans,” Margaret Atwood said in 1986 of The Handmaid’s Tale (1985). “If I wanted to say just one thing I would hire a billboard.” In the thirty-three years since, she seems to have changed her mind. Handmaid contained few maxims, but its newly . . . . Continue Reading »

Islam Made Me Christian

I grew up in northern Italy, in a Catholic household. For us, as for many Italian families, being Catholic was a matter of tradition rather than of faith. When I was young, I attended catechism in Milan, received my sacraments, and believed in God. But my parents did not teach me to practice a . . . . Continue Reading »

Hawthorne’s Daughter

In 1891, Rose Hawthorne Lathrop, daughter of the novelist ­Nathaniel Hawthorne, was received into the Catholic Church. She was forty years old. Within a few years of her conversion she conceived a heroic ministry to destitute cancer patients at a time when cancer was believed to be contagious. She . . . . Continue Reading »

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