Support First Things by turning your adblocker off or by making a  donation. Thanks!

There’s No Place for Us

In 1947, the three most exciting Jews in American entertainment got together to plan their first collaboration. Jerome Robbins had struck Broadway box office gold with On the Town three years earlier. The same show proved that Leonard ­Bernstein was as skilled at writing a catchy tune as . . . . Continue Reading »

Sondheim’s Cynicism

When Stephen Sondheim died in late November at ninety-one, the eulogies, tributes, and bouquets from critics and ­tastemakers were entirely expected. The Broadway composer and lyricist left the Earth having earned multiple Tonys and Grammys, a Pulitzer Prize, an Oscar, a Kennedy Center Honor, and a . . . . Continue Reading »

Sincerely, Rodgers & Hammerstein

Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, who comprised the most consequential partnership in the history of American musical theater, were brought together by chance. It happened in the early 1940s, when each on his own cottoned to the idea of adapting the play Green Grow the Lilacs into . . . . Continue Reading »

Shadow Show

Artemisia: Light and Shadow, a one-act, one-person play at the Flea Theater in Tribeca, portrays the life of the seventeenth-century Baroque painter Artemisia Gentileschi. Continue Reading »

Filter Tag Articles