Real Life Rip Van Winkle Awakens

Jan Grzebski has awakened after 19 years of unconsciousness. When he was in an accident, Poland was in the throes of a communist tyranny. Now it is free, and rocking and rolling (which I also saw on my recent visit there). From the story:“When I went into a coma there was only tea and vinegar . . . . Continue Reading »

Dutch "Organ" TV Game Show A Hoax

Well, I bit. It turns out that the Dutch television show in which a woman was going to decide who would receive her kidney was a hoax designed to pressure the government into changing the organ procurement laws. The reason the hoax was so successful is that such a program seemed quite believable. In . . . . Continue Reading »

Another Take on Kevorkian

Detroit Free Press columnist Brian Dickerson opines that Kevorkian was just a man ahead of his time. Imagine the “reality show” television potential, he writes, if Kevorkian were working today:How differently things might have turned out if the nation’s first shock doc had waited . . . . Continue Reading »

Reuters’ "Five Facts" About Kevorkian

This Reuters sugar piece on Kevorkian leaves out some of the most pertinent parts of his story. Here are five other facts that would seem to be more relevant than Kevorkian teaching himself Japanese:1. The majority of his assisted suicides were not people with terminal illnesses, and indeed, five . . . . Continue Reading »

Jack Kevorkian: Would Be Human Vivisector

This is my last planned installment on the release of Jack Kevorkian from prison. The article could have been called “Kevorkian in His Own Words,” for I present his motives for engaging in his assisted suicide campaign, as he stated them—the right to engage in human experimentation . . . . Continue Reading »

"Dr. Death Rides Again"

As promised, here is the Weekly Standard article I co-authored with Rita Marker, which points up the similarities between Jack Kevorkian’s illegal assisted suicide campaign and the legal assisted suicide regimen currently regent in Oregon. Here are a few excerpts: In 1990, when Kevorkian began . . . . Continue Reading »