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Seizing the Crown of Thorns

As we watch the mostly white officials of the Democratic party pander to black Americans with talk of reparations on which they will never deliver, it is worth pondering their motive. The support of black Americans for the Democratic party is pre­carious. Black America, the secret soul of our . . . . Continue Reading »

Work vs. Consumption

In this issue, Oren Cass explodes the false dichotomy between cultural questions and economic ones(“The Problem with the Culture Problem”). Nowhere is the falsity more evident than in the question that will define the coming decade: Should we emphasize consumption or work? Our answer will have . . . . Continue Reading »

The Individualist

On February 2, 2018, seven members of a group called Bristol Antifascists assembled outside a lecture hall at the University of the West of England in Bristol. They donned balaclavas or dark glasses, according to taste, and entered through the double doors at the back of the hall. “No platform for . . . . Continue Reading »

The Problem with the Culture Problem

Shorthand is convenient, but sometimes it confuses. In the game of telephone, by which ideas evolve through repetition and iteration across generations, words can take on new meanings that diverge from the arguments they once advanced, and come to stand for ideas that lack support altogether. This . . . . Continue Reading »

Against the Open Society

The title of R. R. Reno’s ­Return of the Strong Gods requires qual­ification. To begin with, most of what Reno tells us concerns not the gods’ return, but their expulsion. As for the gods themselves, they “are not golden idols or characters in ancient mythologies,” Reno writes. . . . . Continue Reading »

Loyal to Death

Walter Scott once observed that although astrology, which had enjoyed almost universal credit in the middle of the seventeenth century, had become an object of ridicule by the beginning of the eighteenth, it still retained a number of devotees, even among the learned: Grave and studious men were . . . . Continue Reading »

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