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St. John Paul II: A Centenary Reflection

On May 18, 1920, a third child and second son was born to a retired Polish army officer, Captain Karol Wojtyła, and his wife, Emilia, in Wadowice, a provincial town some fifty kilometers west of Kraków. At his baptism on June 20, the child was named for his father. To what would have been the . . . . Continue Reading »

Bostock

The Supreme Court’s decision in Bostock v. Clayton County, which incorporates sexual orientation and gender identity into Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, is a victory for gay rights advocates and entrenches gender ideology into civil rights law. Many are asking about its implications . . . . Continue Reading »

The Mirrors and the Smoke

The Mirror and the Light by hilary mantel henry holt, 784 pages, $30 The arrival of this final installment of the Thomas Cromwell trilogy, penned by “one of our most important living writers,” has precipitated an avalanche of adulation for its author and her great work, already decorated with . . . . Continue Reading »

Secularism as Sexism

Sex and Secularism by joan wallach scott princeton, 240 pages, $27.95 While traveling in Spain about twenty years ago, I attended the nearest Ash Wednesday Mass I could find. Upon returning from the communion line, I realized that, aside from the priest, I was the only male present. Catholicism, it . . . . Continue Reading »

O'Connor and Race

Radical Ambivalence: Race in Flannery O’Connor by angela alaimo o’donnell fordham, 192 pages, $30 In 1974, ten years after Flannery O’Connor died, Alice Walker visited O’Connor’s farm in Georgia. It was located minutes from the sharecropper shack where Walker had once lived. ­Walker had . . . . Continue Reading »

Christian Democracy

In the early 1950s, the European Union as we know it did not exist, but a process of economic and political cooperation involving most Western European countries was already underway. And those countries came close to choosing a flag that featured the cross to represent their union. The idea for the . . . . Continue Reading »

From Sirens to Song

At first, I didn’t notice the sirens. As a medical doctor, I’d grown used to electronic distress calls. Besides, I live in New York City. Ambulance whines and taxi horns are the treble and tenor lines of urban music. My eight-year-old pointed them out. “Coronavirus,” she said, as an . . . . Continue Reading »

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